Ballquhidder Station Sign

The day to day working of the Caledonian Railway Company, including its constituents and successors.
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Victorian_Lad
Posts: 105
Joined: Mon Jun 05, 2017 9:03 pm

Ballquhidder Station Sign

Post by Victorian_Lad »

Hello, I was curious if anyone might know what the sign underneath the station name may say or have better pictures of it? For modeling purposes, Im modeling alot of stations on the Callander and Oban line and station signs are hard to come by with pictures.

Image
jimwatt2mm
Posts: 707
Joined: Fri Nov 16, 2012 5:36 pm

Re: Ballquhidder Station Sign

Post by jimwatt2mm »

I would guess that it says 'Change (or Alight) here for Lochearnhead St Fillans and Crieff'.

Jim W
MIKEWILLIAMS
Posts: 490
Joined: Mon Aug 20, 2012 4:12 pm

Re: Ballquhidder Station Sign

Post by MIKEWILLIAMS »

The last station is Comrie

Best

Mike
jimwatt2mm
Posts: 707
Joined: Fri Nov 16, 2012 5:36 pm

Re: Ballquhidder Station Sign

Post by jimwatt2mm »

MIKEWILLIAMS wrote:The last station is Comrie

Best

Mike
So it is! I can see that now I'm viewing it on my computer instead of my phone. :oops:

Jim W
dunalastairv
Posts: 219
Joined: Wed Dec 12, 2012 7:01 am

Re: Ballquhidder Station Sign

Post by dunalastairv »

These would have been Caledonian original enamel signs, normally white letters on a dark blue background, all enclosed within a proper wooden frame. The L.M.S. repainted them in chrome yellow with black letters and that is their state in this photograph. I'd be very happy to have them on the wall at Kidderminster Museum!
John Paton
Posts: 186
Joined: Mon Oct 08, 2012 3:50 pm

Re: Ballquhidder Station Sign

Post by John Paton »

Apologies for missing this post.

Michael is correct in saying that normal CR enamel nameboards were white letters on a blue background (see my colour photo of the Killin Junction boards in a previous post), which were usually overpainted by the LMS - black letters on a yellow background.

However Balquhidder was one of a number of CR stations which did not follow that convention. In CR days it had dark letters on a light background - as shown in Kris's photo. I attach a larger image of the photo which is dated 1912 and clearly shows a CR-era scene not long after the branch to Lochearnhead was opened. As none of these boards seem to have survived we can only speculate what the colours were: blue letters on a cream background - it doesn't look white in any of my photos? I also attach a tinted postcard which shows the board on the island platform - I would be reluctant to use this as an indication of colour.

John
Attachments
Balquhidder-compressed.jpg
Balquhidder-compressed.jpg (183.06 KiB) Viewed 8231 times
CA Balquhidder 06 compressed.jpg
CA Balquhidder 06 compressed.jpg (147.77 KiB) Viewed 8231 times
tony brenchley
Posts: 328
Joined: Sun Aug 26, 2012 9:36 am

Re: Ballquhidder Station Sign

Post by tony brenchley »

John

Your mention of the name boards at Killin Junction reminded me of the occasion when my wife and I fought through the undergrowth to get from the road to the station site. This was many, many years ago, more than 40 I would guess. We discovered the enamel name boards lying on the ground still in dark blue with white lettering. I think they were in two parts. I don't remember that there was any evidence that they had been painted over. I would have taken them if I had been driving a lorry at the time! Unfortunately I don't think we took any photos.

Tony B
John Paton
Posts: 186
Joined: Mon Oct 08, 2012 3:50 pm

Re: Ballquhidder Station Sign

Post by John Paton »

Tony - good to see you at the AGM last weekend, and I'm looking forward to your Coupar Angus article in the next TL.

I posted a photo of the Killin Junction nameboards in a post last year but having searched through all the indexes can't find that post now! When I visited Killin Junction - like you many years ago, there were a number of CR enamel running-in boards lying around in the garden of the derelict staff houses. I gathered them together for my photos. The LMS replaced the CR Killin Junction signs in the 1930s with big wooden boards, and this is why they were never overpainted. it seemed that the discarded enamel boards had been taken by the staff to form hen runs or something like this. Like you, I didn't feel up to hauling them down to the main road!

Best wishes,

John
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