Unidentified Location and Carriages and Possibly Company

Any aspect related to the prototype stock.
WCML55.68
Posts: 253
Joined: Sat May 31, 2014 4:37 pm

Re: Unidentified Location and Carriages and Possibly Company

Post by WCML55.68 »

Yes, I went down the coast line on maps and couldnt find a match but didnt get any further.
I had wondered about writing sandwiched between photo and postcard, is there any evidence of this?
Looking again at the 1962 photo of Guthrie, there is a road to the right of the sidings which curves away as in the map and the large tree above the building seems to fit both photos too.
In the subject photo, the platforms are very low height and I suspect it might have been taken with a Twin-lense reflex camera which would mean around waist height. bearing this in mind, a building could be hidden behind the lean-to depending on distances and perspective. I would certainly expect there to be evidence of those sidings but given the huge amount of trees at the side of Guthrie and the shadow they would cause, its quite possible that the film of the day couldnt pick the sidings and other details up. Its possible this shadow has dulled the right hand coping stones if thats what they are, the left hand ones are clear for a considerable distance.
Again be very interesting to see the conclusion of this.
Graham R
Posts: 81
Joined: Sat Sep 14, 2013 8:44 am

Re: Unidentified Location and Carriages and Possibly Company

Post by Graham R »

Maybe the confusion in the photo caption arose from the porter at Guthrie, if that is indeed the location, bawling “change for Arbroath” once the train was stationary (assuming it had come from further north).

I doubt if the photographer used a twin-lens reflex though, they came along 20 years later.

Regards
Graham
WCML55.68
Posts: 253
Joined: Sat May 31, 2014 4:37 pm

Re: Unidentified Location and Carriages and Possibly Company

Post by WCML55.68 »

Would have to disagree with you on the TLR camera.
My Grandpa was a keen photographer and used to do his own developing and printing. He experimented with tints at this stage, sepia, nice, red and green, a bit gawdy. He had a fine collection of TLR cameras and two of them dated back to the 1880s. His other passion was the cello and he played professionally, I remember his mentioning Philharmonic and the BBC just around the corner. I dont know what happened to that collection but I used a Voigtlander for a while which came through my Dad, it possibly came from this collection when Grandpa died in the 1960s. 120 film which produced fine results but was the devil as it had no interlock to prevent double exposure without winding on. Witness scans sent to JimS!
They lived in a quite posh tenement in the West End, half glazed tiles in the ground floor close, blue starburst panes in the corners of each landing sash, stained glass front doors on each landing, and beautifully intricate plaster cornices and centre pieces. A wonderful age.
It was here that I first experienced Pears soap. You could smell the aroma as soon as you entered the bathroom and the lather was beautifully soft and plentiful partly due to the soft Glasgow water. The scent stayed with you most of the day and you would feel so fresh and could always tell if someone else used Pears. It was made from totally natural ingredients and was matured for something like 3 months. It was expensive, our family couldnt afford it. The company was taken over and the recipe changed to include chemicals and the maturing process was speeded up by the use of diesel engines to produce heat. They blamed the diesel engines unhealthy exhausts for another change in the production process. Production was also moved to India at sometime, possibly after the fire. They lost the plot and a large loyal following and a huge campaign was fought to try and get the original recipe back. A facebook page was launched and it ended up with the company saying "take the page down and we will return to the original recipe". They lied.
My uncle also was a musician, cello, and a keen cyclist and photographer and had a fine collection of railway slides, many taken on the society tours around Scotland and photos taken on cycling trips in the 1920s onwards. A sad story not appropriate here, but I tried to save the photos but I think the whole lot went to a house clearance. Whether they survived who knows but I dread to think what might have been lost.
The PEARS soap and EPPS COCOA enamel signs on the subject photo although offering no clue to location might be instrumental if another early photo turns up.
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