Transport of Building Materials

Any aspect related to the prototype stock.
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lindsay_g
Posts: 404
Joined: Mon Aug 13, 2012 8:43 pm

Transport of Building Materials

Post by lindsay_g »

Thinking of plausible goods loads in and out my Barnton layout, I can come up with some possible incoming loads but no outgoing lads (the latter isn't a cause for concern in any case). The incoming loads for the period that I'm modelling could well be around house building so from the founds up in a basic structure : drain pipes, lead piping, brick, stone, lime and sand, timber, slates and tiles, chimney pots, and probably more besides.

Out of that list, I've seen images of the Caley transporting drain pipes, timber, and bricks (about 1 of each!). However, how was sand and lime transported in bulk for making of mortar? The Caley did have 40 lime wagons around 1900-1910 but was that lime for builders? How were tiles and slates transported? I haven't come across any images other than the Welsh narrow gauge railways getting slates downhill to the main lines. Tiles (Rosemary in partic) were/are a lot more fragile than slates so I can't image that they were just "thrown in" for transportation.

Cheers,

Lindsay
Steve Parsons
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Joined: Thu Jun 12, 2014 9:01 pm

Re: Transport of Building Materials

Post by Steve Parsons »

I could be wrong but wasn't one of the trains in one of the sidings at Quintishill at the time of the disaster a returning train of empty open wagons from Wales which had been carrying roofing slates which suggests that they at least were transported stacked in open wagon
jim mac
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Joined: Mon Aug 13, 2012 7:20 pm

Re: Transport of Building Materials

Post by jim mac »

Reports of the Quintinshill accident give the empty wagon train as returning to South Wales after delivering coal to Grangemouth for the Grand Fleet at Scapa Flow.
The attach photograph shows two of them, perhaps someone can confirm if Kestell Bros. were in the coal trade.
Clearing Debris.jpg
Clearing Debris.jpg (394.6 KiB) Viewed 6477 times
jim mac
MIKEWILLIAMS
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Joined: Mon Aug 20, 2012 4:12 pm

Re: Transport of Building Materials

Post by MIKEWILLIAMS »

Lindsay, the lime wagons carried quicklime - see wagon book p.161 and supplement p. 34. Materials for mortar would have travelled in sacks

The carriage of 'Traffic in bulk' which included bricks etc. was carried in open wagons. - See General instructions for Goods Mineral and Livestock traffic p. 24.

Best

Mike
emckeng
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Joined: Sat Jan 19, 2013 11:20 am

Re: Transport of Building Materials

Post by emckeng »

Kestell Bros. were shipowners and coal exporters.

I think it more likely that lime for mortar would be transported in wooden barrels. Sacks, unless multi-layer paper, tend to let the water in.

regards,
Ed. McKenna
MIKEWILLIAMS
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Re: Transport of Building Materials

Post by MIKEWILLIAMS »

I was thinking Hessian, Ed, but you have a point. I have a picture of wagons at Coltness ironworks with loads of empty barrels standing about. This leads me to another thought. The Coltness company advertised the sale of bricks, Portland cement and enamelled sanitary ware. Might an order for same have been transported in their wagons to a builder?

Best

Mike
Dave John
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Joined: Wed Aug 15, 2012 7:42 am

Re: Transport of Building Materials

Post by Dave John »

Looking at the picture of Buchanan St Goods in the new wagon book the thing that strikes me is the number of wooden crates to be seen. The dropside wagon on the right also has a liberal layer of straw under the crates. Perhaps crating and packing with straw would be the normal method of transport for more fragile things such as tiles and so on ?
Ian Smeeton
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Joined: Tue Apr 19, 2016 11:40 am

Re: Transport of Building Materials

Post by Ian Smeeton »

They would probably all be sheeted in transit.

Regards

Ian
MIKEWILLIAMS
Posts: 490
Joined: Mon Aug 20, 2012 4:12 pm

Re: Transport of Building Materials

Post by MIKEWILLIAMS »

To quote from the 'General Instructions....' again, in para 90 it says that straw was used to prevent chafing when loading 'bales, packs, trusses and other Goods of a similar description.' And 'Light castings should be carefully packed with straw, in such a manner as will keep them from shifting when the wagons are being shunted.' para 93

Best

Mike
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