Bowness on solway Station Building.

Any aspect related to the structures and equipment on the Caledonian Railway Company.
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Violets49
Posts: 35
Joined: Tue Mar 11, 2014 1:34 am

Bowness on solway Station Building.

Post by Violets49 »

I have a query about the former station building at Bowness on Solway on the Solway Junction railway. Although the railway is long gone, the Station buildings are still in situe as a private residence. There are several photographs of the station and signal cabin in use. Sadly most of these photos are taken a quite a distance. There was a sort of canopy or veranda in front of the main two story building My question is was this merely a shelter? It might be supposed that there would be access to the building here but photographs of the building after railway services were witdrawn shows this canopy gone and two windows, but no trace of a door. Either on the two story section or the single story section. Were these buildings only staff (Station Master) accomodation? If not, how did the travelling public gain access? some of the photos show old carriages on the platform. Were they the station facilities?
Dave Lochrie
Posts: 449
Joined: Mon Aug 20, 2012 8:38 pm

Re: Bowness on solway Station Building.

Post by Dave Lochrie »

Jane,
No definitive answer, but there must have been public access to the platform via the main building, and this must have been where the booking office was located.I just can't establish whether access to the platform was through the building or around it.
Bowness 4.JPG
Bowness 4.JPG (111.31 KiB) Viewed 4453 times
Picture 1 shows a rebuilt 2-4-0 (more on this later?) approaching from the viaduct end in the mid 1900s. There is so much detail on this picture, and I'm including a close up below but I'm posting the full shot to establish that although there is a boarded crossing between the two platforms at the south end, it doesn't appear that the public access was from the yard. Note the LNWR type water crane (currently available in model form from Skytrex in 4 and 7mm scales) and the way that the crossing clears the point rodding.
Bowness6.jpg
Bowness6.jpg (167.28 KiB) Viewed 4453 times
Picture 2
Taken from the over bridge looking south and taken in 1913 - I can't make out the reason for the celebrations but the platform gardens show evidence of much decoration. It shows the arrangement of extensions at the northern end of the building (mainly toilets) and another sleeper crossing between the two short platforms, but no obvious point of access. There is a further grounded body (van or PBV) between the platform and over bridge -possibly connected with the maintainace team for the Solway viaduct (or maybe a border post!!). Nice subject for a model if you have a very narrow but long shelf, though capturing the flat somewhat bleak setting of the Moss could prove challenging.
Bowness7.JPG
Bowness7.JPG (124.51 KiB) Viewed 4453 times
Picture 3 -close up of 1 above clearly shows that there is no gate in the platform fence. So much detail to note :
-the grounded carriage (a former luggage 3rd from the early 1870's?) -whatever it's purpose, doesn't appear to be open to the public (storage or goods/ parcels)
-timber platform construction,
-white painted platform fencing with 2 horizontal battens,
-enamel signs -both the Lipton and the Pears are in the top-ten of adverts featuring on Caledonian stations the latter does not appear to be straight(which would just look wrong if copied on a model),
-the bench is non-standard to say the least and note the small post and wire protection for the platform planting when in season,
-the small "running in" board (Bowness, not Bowness-on-Solway) is also non-standard -appears to show the name in white serif letters with black shading probably on a blue background with white framing,
-the post-mounted oil lamp is of a more sophisticated pattern than that normally seen on rural stations.
-in the shadow of the canopy you can see the platform scales to weigh parcels.
Its hard to tell but I think there is a possibility of platform access behind the lamp, between the carriage body and the main building -look at the OXO ad that appears to go behind the carriage. Both the 1899 and 1924 OS sheets show a much larger gap than the foreshortening on the photo would suggest, but they also raise another question.
Caledonian carriages of the 1870 mostly survived till the grouping (just), 4 wheeled vehicles tended to be withdrawn ahead of 6 wheeled contemporaries. The carriage body in both OS sheets have identical dimensions, which if the same vehicle would imply withdrawal of a vehicle less than 25 years old. I'd always been aware that the grouded carriage was only a few years older than the c.1880 vehicles approaching from Scotland.

Dave L

The loco -I don't envy David Hamilton's task regarding Part 1 of the Caledonian Locomotive book. I've gone over the McEwan articles, the George Russell updates in TTL, and even Baxters' British Locomotive Catalogue, but I still can't fully identify the locomotive. I know the Drummond rebuilds are a complicated story (this is one of those that retained the original cab) but I must be missing something obvious, because I'm pretty certain the last two digits are 27, and nothing seems to match. Help please!
Last edited by Dave Lochrie on Wed Apr 25, 2018 9:07 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Violets49
Posts: 35
Joined: Tue Mar 11, 2014 1:34 am

Re: Bowness on solway Station Building.

Post by Violets49 »

Thank you Dave.
I have several photos of the building after the line closed (Its still there) The shelter on the two storey building has been removed to reveal two windows but no visible trace of a door although the photo isn't close enough to be certain that a doorway hasn't been blocked up.

Jane.
Dave Lochrie
Posts: 449
Joined: Mon Aug 20, 2012 8:38 pm

Re: Bowness on solway Station Building.

Post by Dave Lochrie »

Earlier on this post I expressed frustration identifying the rebuilt 2-4-0 locomotive that had just ventured over the border. In the article in TTL140 Page 18 it has been noted as possibly 0-6-0, CR No327. I'm sure it's not that rebuilt! I've gone back to Baxter, the McEwan articles and Gearge Russell's brilliant attempt to make sense of these in TTL 54 and 55.
The most likely candidate is CR No127 though CR No427 is also a possibility. By a quirk of the totally irrational Caledonian locomotive re-numbering both these engines are adjacent members, Nos 586 & 587, of the 236 Class of 1872.
CR No127 started as No586, was renumbered in 1896, 1899, 1900 and again in 1905 when allocated No127 which she carried till finally renumbered as No1586 (for the second time) in 1909 -this gives a window for the photograph.
CR No427 started as No587, was renumbered in 1896, 1899, 1900, and carried No427 between 1901 and 1909, when it became CR No1527 for the second time.
They were withdrawn in 1910 an 1912 respectively. Both were rebuilt, but not properly, whatever that meant! They received Drummond style boilers which had probably been taken from Drummond's original 2-4-0 rebuilds of the 417 Class after the increased boiler pressure cracked their frames (and Caledonian 2-4-0s had massive frames). Because the were not classified as rebuilt it is difficult to establish when this "rebuild" took place. They were reputedly referred to as "mongrels' by engine crews.
No427 (587) was photographed on the turntable at Crieff at the end of August 1894 as 587 still in original condition. The attached picture is of the most likely candidate for the Bowness-on-Solway engine CR No127 (586), in "rebuilt" condition, also photographed between 1905 and 1909, and at Kingmoor, which also puts in in the right area. I think these were more attractive than the full rebuilds with the closed splashers and the Stirling style cab.
CR No127 (ex586) .jpg
CR No127 (ex586) .jpg (118.82 KiB) Viewed 4012 times
As I said above, I don't envy David Hamilton's Task on Volume 1 of Caledonian Locomotives, but I'm looking forward to the result!
DaveL
Dave Lochrie
Posts: 449
Joined: Mon Aug 20, 2012 8:38 pm

Re: Bowness on solway Station Building.

Post by Dave Lochrie »

The most likely candidate is CR No127 though CR No427 is also a possibility. By a quirk of the totally irrational Caledonian locomotive re-numbering both these engines are adjacent members, Nos 586 & 587, of the 236 Class of 1872.
CR No127 started as No586, was renumbered in 1896, 1899, 1900 and again in 1905 when allocated No127 which she carried till finally renumbered as No1586 (for the second time) in 1909 -this gives a window for the photograph.
CR No427 started as No587, was renumbered in 1896, 1899, 1900, and carried No427 between 1901 and 1909, when it became CR No1527 for the second time.
They were withdrawn in 1910 an 1912 respectively. Both were rebuilt, but not properly, whatever that meant! They received Drummond style boilers which had probably been taken from Drummond's original 2-4-0 rebuilds of the 417 Class after the increased boiler pressure cracked their frames (and Caledonian 2-4-0s had massive frames). Because the were not classified as rebuilt it is difficult to establish when this "rebuild" took place. They were reputedly referred to as "mongrels' by engine crews.
The attached picture is of the most likely candidate for the Bowness-on-Solway engine CR No127 (586), in "rebuilt" condition, also photographed between 1905 and 1909, and at Kingmoor, which also puts in in the right area. I think these were more attractive than the full rebuilds with the closed splashers and the Stirling style cab.
Just to conclude my own post, the Locomotive Register, (Chapter 15, Page 307) in David Hamilton's Caledonian Railway Locomotives confirms that the locomotive in the picture would be No127, a number which was only carried from 1905 till re-numbered as No1587 in 1906, in which year it was also withdrawn.
So, a much more specific date for the Bowness on Solway photograph.

Dave L
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