Glasgow Central Railway Tunnel Ventilator

Any aspect related to the structures and equipment on the Caledonian Railway Company.
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IBrown
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Glasgow Central Railway Tunnel Ventilator

Post by IBrown » Mon Feb 04, 2013 11:19 pm

I recall reading when the Glasgow Central Low Level line (“Argyle Line”) re-opened back in 1979, BR ScR engineers had sought advice from BR Southern Region on the behaviour and movement of air displaced ahead of trains in the tunnel sections.

The original line, the Glasgow Central Railway (GCR) was completed in 1896. The mid section included the same tunnel sections as the Argyle Line. The Caledonian absorbed GCR in 1889, so I assume the Caledonian drew up the original specifications for the tunnel ventilation. But where would it seek advice in those days? I seriously doubt anything like the tunnel ventilator which it built in 1895 at Wellington Court, Glasgow existed previously.

From the little I’ve been able to learn about this installation, it appears to be a unique piece of Victorian industrial machinery, but finding information on it has been difficult – it seems to have all but vanished from history - if not from memory - my own knowledge of it came from work colleagues – long after the line closed. Recently I searched J R Hume’s “Industrial History of Glasgow”, but although he had notes of industry in the next court, Wellington Court was left blank. Information on the Court contained in Glasgow Digital Library is sparse to say the least and is undated: "Wellington Court was of small proportions, but here was the printing-office of Messrs. James Hedderwick & Sons, who for a number of months printed the Glasgow Argus, till it got premises of its own in Queen Street."

http://gdl.cdlr.strath.ac.uk/airgli/airgli0107.htm

A discussion on the ventilator starts on Urban Glasgow at page 9 of "Abandoned Central low level in 1967" thread:-
http://urbanglasgow.co.uk/ftopic3419-0-asc-80.php

and photos of the only part of the ventilator visible to the general public – a 100 foot tall chimney stack near old St Enoch Station – appear on page 11:-
http://urbanglasgow.co.uk/ftopic3419-0-asc-100.php

but few would know what that chimney stack was for!

Scans of the engineering drawings for the infrastructure (buildings and ventilator tunnel only) – ‘National Records of Scotland, plans RHP123709 and RHP130540, reproduced by kind permission of BRB (Residuary) Ltd.’ - appear on page 24:-
http://urbanglasgow.co.uk/ftopic3419-0-asc-230.php


From these, I can just about describe what was there. The ventilator tunnel, the same dimensions as the rail tunnel, runs off at right angles from the rail tunnel at the present day Argyle Street station, and splits in two before entering two fan chambers at the end of the tunnel. Each chamber has its own fan. It appears the fans were originally steam-driven, but details of the engine (possibly engines - there were two boilers) and the crank / drive shafts aren't included in this drawing. I was told that the fans were electric-driven, so this must have happened later on. There is reference to a cellar - this is the coal bunker and boiler house which has its own chimney. The plan does not show any access from the buildings to the ventilator tunnel. The tunnel walls are shown to be constructed from some exceptionally thick unknown material which I think must mean that it was specially constructed to ensure smoke can't permeate through it - so having an access from the buildings would seem unlikely as they couldn't be kept smoke-proof.

The next part I need some help on is to identify the type of boilers, engine (s), drive mechanism and fan arrangement etc. For example is this an early steam turbine which generates electricity to drive the fans? How efficient was the arrangement? (the atmosphere in the tunnels and stations was said to be dire while trains remained steam-hauled). So where would I look for that?

And what happened to the ventilator tunnel when the Argyle Line was built? Does it remain to ventilate Argyle Street station? There is a curiously large fan on the roof of the new building at the corner of Osborne Street and Stockwell Street – it seems much too large for air conditioning that building. It is plainly visible on google map.

Jim Summers
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Re: Glasgow Central Railway Tunnel Ventilator

Post by Jim Summers » Tue Feb 05, 2013 11:07 am

Sadly, I cannot help with this, though I have long been fascinated by it.

My involvement was with getting the line reopened, and I went through (in a Land Rover) once or twice. No mention was made of the vent by the Project Engineer, Sandy Adams, who was more concerned with the sewer which runs along the tunnel side, and particularly with any water he saw springing out from the walls. He smelt it!
I do recall going over a bump, which Sandy proclaimed was the Molendinar. I also remember standing on the hillside and with a wave of his hand he told us where the Kelvinhaugh diveunder would run an break into the old tunnel. Just about under the corner of a school playground, as I remember.

Sadly, Sandy, who was a fine engineer is now dead, as is the highly capable Robin Kerr, who was Project Manager (and claimed to have made a nominal start with the new tunnel from Bridgeton Cross to Bridgeton Central, which in the event had not been authorised. We should pay tribute to these chaps, who did so much very skilfully.

So that hasn't helped you much, but I just wanted to thank you for starting this off. And those drawings are wonderful.

Jim S

John Paton
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Re: Glasgow Central Railway Tunnel Ventilator

Post by John Paton » Tue Feb 05, 2013 2:28 pm

I recall chatting about the Central Low Level line ventilation with the late Jim McEwan (J F McEwan), when he lent me a photo of the ventilation chimney he took from the St Enoch platforms. He told me that the system was electrically operated when he knew it, and maintained by St Rollox where there was electrical expertise. My understanding is that a horizontal ventilation shaft ran from the running tunnel under Argyle Street, under Wellington Court, to the fans and chimney which lay in the back-court of Wellington Court. I attach photos of the construction taken from the CR GCR photo album which show this. The location of these photos originally caused confusion because many people assumed that Wellington Court was at Wellington Street, and therefore the photos showed works associated with Central Low Level Station. I went into Mitchell Library in the days when the old Glasgow Post Office directories were available on the shelves and correctly located Wellington Court. I assume that railway ownership of the court and backcourt gave BR the opportunity to build Argyle Street station without having to acquire more land, and that the present station occupies the site of the extract system.

I have heard it said that there was another extract between Central Low Level and Anderston, marked until recent years by two large wooden ventilators which sat on the grass on the north side of Argyle Street in front of the Anderston shopping centre. However I have never been able to see the extract portals in the tunnel wall - they may have been bricked-up years ago. This area was redeveloped recently and the "Cuprum" building now sits on the site.

I attach Jim's photo of the chimney, plus the CR construction photos. Note that the CR seems to have taken over one of the shop units (possibly as a site office) and displayed travel posters in the window.

I hope that this is helpful : sorry I can't answer any of the technical questions.

John Paton
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IBrown
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Re: Glasgow Central Railway Tunnel Ventilator

Post by IBrown » Tue Feb 05, 2013 9:13 pm

Thank you, John. I too was misled for some time into thinking Wellington Court was off Wellington Street / Lane, and initially dismissed the drawings as probably applying to Glasgow Central Low Level ‘smoke-hole’. It was just a chance further look at the St Enoch area back in December and selecting the 1892/94 map that I finally found it. There is an embedded link to that map on page 15 of Urban Glasgow (which is too large to post longhand) so go to :-

http://urbanglasgow.co.uk/ftopic3419-0-asc-140.php

and in the 2nd post, by Cell, click on the NLS link which shows clearly where Wellington Court was.

John, National Archives of Scotland also has a drawing for a ‘fan’ located between Glasgow Central LL and Anderston Cross.

Your 2nd photo is a good one which relates well to the engineering drawings. It shows quite clearly the 6 foot tall and 12 foot wide arches which formed the ventilator tunnel roof. This is also the end of the tunnel (the St Enoch’s end of the Court) and the twin chambers are readily identifiable from the ‘dovetail shape’ of the excavations which widen out here towards the camera.

Your 3rd photo poses questions as the first drawing I posted shows an Archway entrance from Argyle Street into the Court. I had assumed there wasn’t a building on Argyle Street above the tunnel because of weight restrictions on it. But ‘archway’ may have been a Glasgow common close – but there seems to be work going on affecting it judging by the different widths between its back and front entrances. Remember they'd to haul coal through there. It’s a pity we don’t have the address on Argyle Street. It would be interesting to try and locate a post-1896 photo of the ‘close’. On the subject of ownership, I had also understood that even in BR days a rent was paid for Wellington Court, but I suspect that this may have been a nominal annual sum for ‘right of entry’ into the court, for example a wayleave. As I said earlier, I would have thought a comprehensive work would exist which covers all these issues, but where?

IBrown
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Re: Glasgow Central Railway Tunnel Ventilator

Post by IBrown » Tue Feb 05, 2013 9:34 pm

Jim Summers wrote:Sadly, I cannot help with this, though I have long been fascinated by it.

My involvement was with getting the line reopened, and I went through (in a Land Rover) once or twice. No mention was made of the vent by the Project Engineer, Sandy Adams, who was more concerned with the sewer which runs along the tunnel side, and particularly with any water he saw springing out from the walls. He smelt it!
I do recall going over a bump, which Sandy proclaimed was the Molendinar. I also remember standing on the hillside and with a wave of his hand he told us where the Kelvinhaugh diveunder would run an break into the old tunnel. Just about under the corner of a school playground, as I remember.

Sadly, Sandy, who was a fine engineer is now dead, as is the highly capable Robin Kerr, who was Project Manager (and claimed to have made a nominal start with the new tunnel from Bridgeton Cross to Bridgeton Central, which in the event had not been authorised. We should pay tribute to these chaps, who did so much very skilfully.

So that hasn't helped you much, but I just wanted to thank you for starting this off. And those drawings are wonderful.

Jim S
Thanks for your post, Jim. I'd like to leave your input for later because it deals with another aspect which I'd like to raise in a seperate thread about the original railway, and the re-opened one, which has puzzled even some Drivers working over the line - what are the sounds of running water that can be heard while in the tunnels?

I traced St Enoch's burn to Buchanan Street; two wells and two 4 foot diameter culverts under the track in the tunnel at Central Low Level - but a sewer running parallel with and outside the tunnel walls, and the Molendinar crossing so close under the trackbed is new and interesting information.

IBrown
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Re: Glasgow Central Railway Tunnel Ventilator

Post by IBrown » Tue Apr 02, 2013 12:08 pm

Extract from page 440 of Engineer Oct 30 1896 (p10 of pdf document)

http://www.gracesguide.co.uk/images/0/04/Er18961030.pdf

"Amongst other features of interest may be noted the steam driven ventilating fan in Wellington Court, midway between the Glasgow Central and Glasgow Cross Stations, with an exhaustive power of 150,000 cubic feet per minute. The fan was erected by Messrs. Walker Brothers, of Wigan, and is similar to that erected by this firm for Mansion House Station, London. In this connection it may be remembered that Messrs. Walker Brothers also carried out the ventilating plant for the Mersey and Severn Tunnels."

Smallest of leads, may help me track down similar installations.

charles d
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Re: Glasgow Central Railway Tunnel Ventilator

Post by charles d » Tue Apr 02, 2013 9:12 pm

I'm not sure if this will help but Walker Bros were also big suppliers of fans and other plant to collieries, especially in the West Lancs coalfield - no surprise given their Wigan base

Charles d

IBrown
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Re: Glasgow Central Railway Tunnel Ventilator

Post by IBrown » Tue Apr 02, 2013 10:30 pm

Thank you, Charles. Grace’s Guide features Walker Brothers and their contemporary advert for tunnel ventilating equipment makes interesting reading - 3rd item on the advert.

There are also photos of the equipment at this link. I see from these why I couldn’t figure out how the engine drove the fan as it was positioned at right angles to it – I was thinking of cranks and driveshafts, rather than flywheels and belts - link the 1910 Ventilating Fan (Trencherfield Mill) photo with the 1898 Ventilating Engine (Garswood Hall ) photo to see what I mean. The 1898 photo is also very reminiscent of the engineering drawings of the building housing the Wellington Court equipment, down to the arch-topped windows.

http://www.gracesguide.co.uk/Walker_Brothers
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IBrown
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Re: Glasgow Central Railway Tunnel Ventilator

Post by IBrown » Fri Apr 05, 2013 9:07 pm

When I opened the thread I was puzzled by where the technology had been sourced from. I have since learned that the installation wasn’t unique and the technology was well understood by tunnel engineers of that time, evidenced by this extract from p201 to p212 from Chapter XI Tunnel Ventilation of the book ‘Modern Tunnelling Methods’, published in 1909. It contains short illustrated descriptions of the mechanical ventilating systems of some of the World’s best known railway tunnels, and is available to download free as a pdf document at:-

http://www.ebooksread.com/authors...m-a ... -hci.shtml


Artificial ventilation is now the rule wherever the train intervals are short; and the principle generally adopted is that of exhausting the vitiated air at a point midway of a tunnel, or tunnel section, and drawing in fresh air at the ends of the section.

In a paper upon this subject, presented to the Institution of Civil Engineers by Francis Fox, M. Inst. C. E., the author says that he has ascertained by experiment that so long as the amount of carbon dioxide in the air does not exceed 20 parts in 10,000, the air in a railway tunnel is satisfactory.

Mr. Fox goes on to say that, having ascertained the consumption of coal by a locomotive in its passage through a tunnel, and allowing 29 cubic feet of poisonous gases for each pound of coal consumed, the volume of fresh air required to maintain the tunnel at the above standard can be ascertained as follows :


The number of pounds of fuel consumed per mile, multiplied by 29, multiplied by 500, and divided by the number of minutes' interval between trains, will give the cubic feet of air which must be introduced per minute into the tunnel. Assuming as an illustration a tunnel one mile long, consumption of fuel 32 pounds per mile, and one train passing through the tunnel in each direction every five minutes, the volume of fresh air required per minute will be:

32 lbs. x 29 cu. ft. x 500 / 2 ½ minutes = 185,600 cu. ft.

This is the basic principle of the ventilation of the Mersey and Severn tunnels; and the ventilation was satisfactory until the traffic exceeded the capacity of the ventilating plant originally put in. In the Mersey tunnel the system of electric traction was adopted in 1902.


Mersey, Severn Tunnel and Wellington Court ventilators were all designed, built and installed by Walker Brothers of Wigan. The Wellington Court system capacity was 150,000 cu. ft. per minute. According to the principle of extraction at the mid-point and intake at each end of the tunnel section - in this case Glasgow Central LL and Glasgow Cross - it now appears that what casual observers tended to regard as ‘smoke outlets’ there, were actually supposed to be fresh-air inlets. But given the dire reports of the atmospheric conditions in the tunnels throughout the line’s life, despite the ventilation system, what went wrong?
John Paton wrote: …….. I have heard it said that there was another extract between Central Low Level and Anderston, marked until recent years by two large wooden ventilators which sat on the grass on the north side of Argyle Street in front of the Anderston shopping centre. However I have never been able to see the extract portals in the tunnel wall - they may have been bricked-up years ago. This area was redeveloped recently and the "Cuprum" building now sits on the site…….. John Paton


John, I worked at Scottish Executive’s Europa Building during 2005/6 (the Anderston Centre was being demolished then) and these wooden buildings were still there then, on the grass verge as you say. I had problems identifying the NAS drawings for this – the problem being there is a typo in the description - ‘far’ instead of ‘fan’ – but it’s RHP123856 and 123857, “Ventilation of GCR between Glasgow Green and Anderston Cross + ventilating fan between Central LL and Anderston Cross”, dated 1918. It’ll be Wednesday 17th before I can next visit.

I’m still trying to get information and / or photos on the ventilating equipment. There’s a story on the web of a group of Newspaper Reporters who took a stroll through the LL tunnels in the early 1970’s and finding a room off Argyle Street ‘full of Victorian ventilation machinery’. Shouldn’t be surprised if this group did a story about that adventure and took photos - and these are in some newspaper archive. I contacted Evening Times on this (one of its reporters was in the group) but didn’t get a reply. :x

IBrown
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Re: Glasgow Central Railway Tunnel Ventilator

Post by IBrown » Fri May 31, 2013 2:31 pm

John Paton wrote:
I have heard it said that there was another extract between Central Low Level and Anderston, marked until recent years by two large wooden ventilators which sat on the grass on the north side of Argyle Street in front of the Anderston shopping centre. However I have never been able to see the extract portals in the tunnel wall - they may have been bricked-up years ago. This area was redeveloped recently and the "Cuprum" building now sits on the site.
John Paton
Hi John,

I managed to visit National Archives of Scotland this week and looked at plan RHP123857 'Proposed Ventilation Fan between Central Low Level and Anderston Cross' parts of which I’ve reproduced here by kind permission of BRB (Residuary).

Unfortunately, it asks more questions than it answers as it doesn’t match up with our view of where it was – the remains we saw were certainly on the north side of Argyle Street but this plan shows smoke extraction was on the south side, at Brown Street.

I don’t know whether the proposal actually went ahead. The date is 29/10/1918 so it also appears to have gone in well after the railway opened.

(re: your email, still collecting my thoughts and will to respond)

Ian
RHP123857 800X600 Street Plan.JPG
Plan shows smoke extraction on the south side of Argyle Street.
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RHP123857 800 X 600 Tunnel Opening.JPG
Similar to Wellington Court, with 4 ventilation tunnels off the running tunnel rather than 1.
RHP123857 800 X 600 Tunnel Opening.JPG (175.68 KiB) Viewed 21381 times
RHP123857 800X600 Fan House.JPG
Similar to Wellington Court, but motor-driven from the start.
RHP123857 800X600 Fan House.JPG (150.38 KiB) Viewed 21381 times

John Paton
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Re: Glasgow Central Railway Tunnel Ventilator

Post by John Paton » Mon Jun 03, 2013 5:54 pm

Hi Ian,

Looking at OS maps and aerial photos gives inconclusive results. It does appear that the Brown Street / Argyle Street corner had lower buildings than the four-storey tenements that typically lined these streets. Nothing shows any sign of a chimney. I attach an early 1950s OS extract, plus three post-war aerial photos zoomed-in to try and pick up detail.

John
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John Paton
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Re: Glasgow Central Railway Tunnel Ventilator

Post by John Paton » Mon Jun 03, 2013 5:56 pm

Sorry - one photo did not attach. Here it is.

John
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IBrown
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Re: Glasgow Central Railway Tunnel Ventilator

Post by IBrown » Mon Jun 10, 2013 6:55 am

Hi John,

I contacted Ian Russell who had been through the tunnels several times in 1965/67 on his recollections of this section. Here's his reply:

"Sorry for the delay in replying. I was busy with some electronics work that needed to be completed and my mind was diverted a bit. In answer to your question and having looked at the drawings of the four arches I definitely recall an opening in the tunnel roughly about where your fan was situated between Central and Anderston X but on the north side of the line. However rather than it being just dark openings, I recall arched openings with some daylight coming from above and behind the arches light falling into a large rectangular space. This makes me wonder if the system was altered some time later on to be a smoke hole rather than four tunnels leading to a fan house or in fact never built to the plan. In other words what I saw may have been the remains of the original system or what was finally decided upon."

Ian's recollection that this was on the North side is in accord with the wooden structure we both saw just west of Scottish Executive's Europa Building, on the north side of Argyle Street.

Ian

IBrown
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Re: Glasgow Central Railway Tunnel Ventilator

Post by IBrown » Sat Dec 07, 2013 8:19 pm

Jim Summers wrote:Sadly, I cannot help with this, though I have long been fascinated by it.

My involvement was with getting the line reopened, and I went through (in a Land Rover) once or twice. No mention was made of the vent by the Project Engineer, Sandy Adams, who was more concerned with the sewer which runs along the tunnel side, and particularly with any water he saw springing out from the walls. He smelt it!
I do recall going over a bump, which Sandy proclaimed was the Molendinar. I also remember standing on the hillside and with a wave of his hand he told us where the Kelvinhaugh diveunder would run an break into the old tunnel. Just about under the corner of a school playground, as I remember.

Sadly, Sandy, who was a fine engineer is now dead, as is the highly capable Robin Kerr, who was Project Manager (and claimed to have made a nominal start with the new tunnel from Bridgeton Cross to Bridgeton Central, which in the event had not been authorised. We should pay tribute to these chaps, who did so much very skilfully.

So that hasn't helped you much, but I just wanted to thank you for starting this off. And those drawings are wonderful.

Jim S
Hi Jim,

Further to our conversation today, this is the item on the 'group of reporters' trip through the tunnels I referred to.

"We also once met a journalist from the Evening Times who told us that he was part of a journalist's exploration of the abandoned tunnels in the
70s (i.e. before the Argyle Line re-opened), and that they'd found a large room beneath Argyle Street, off the main tunnel, full of Victorian
ventilation machinery.
No-one's ever confirmed this (and obviously none of the MCG would never go anywhere near a "live" tunnel without permission / an escort), so it
remains a mystery. Does anyone know the truth?"

http://groups.google.com/group/uk.railw ... b3f70dceac


I tried to follow up this story by emailing Evening Times, [email protected] (I received no reply) as I don't believe a group of reporters would go walkabout in the tunnels without taking lighting and cameras with them. That they had lighting is self evident when they knew the room was full of machinery, and that it was victorian, and surely they'd collaborate on an Article about their trip and publish?


I also spoke briefly about it with Jill Scott at CRA Meeting on 5th October this year, after she revealed both she and Bill were Glasgow newspaper reporters, but she hadn't heard anything about that particular trip, nor could she give me a contact.

Ian Russell, who took the photos which appear on the Urban Glasgow thread 'Abandoned Central Low Level 1967', could not recall the entrance to the ventilation shaft until he saw the drawing from National Archives, the bar across the entrance being the feature that jogged his memory. He too decided to give it a miss - but now regrets doing that.

JimG
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Re: Glasgow Central Railway Tunnel Ventilator

Post by JimG » Sun Dec 08, 2013 8:27 am

Good Lord, me on the Usenet thirteen years ago. :)

JimG

IBrown
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Re: Glasgow Central Railway Tunnel Ventilator

Post by IBrown » Mon Dec 09, 2013 6:52 am

Hi Jim, small world. :D

Jim Summers
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Re: Glasgow Central Railway Tunnel Ventilator

Post by Jim Summers » Thu Jan 16, 2014 10:38 pm

This topic has been quiet for a while, but I came across this entry when I was at the NRS the other day:

"Ventilating Fan Argyle St. – submitted Messrs Mavor & Coulson’s offer of 23rd November 1908. Accepted at £343 . 17/-"
Min. 808 Loco & Stores Committee 16.02.1909

Could this imply some problem with the installation after not many years, I wonder?
Or some supplementary ventilation needed?

Or was it for the shaft along at the Anderston end?

Jim S

IBrown
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Re: Glasgow Central Railway Tunnel Ventilator

Post by IBrown » Sat Jan 25, 2014 10:17 am

Earlier in the thread John Paton said J F McEwan had given him some information on Wellington Court: the McEwan Collection is held at East Dunbartonshire Archives and while there I searched his manuscript of an unpublished? book on the Caledonian, and this is what he had to say on ventilation fans:-

“Air vents act as smoke escapes and to prevent pressure building up in the tunnels. (Wellington Court), 2 vents between Central LL and Anderston and one between Anderston and Stobcross - were all fan-assisted ventilation from the side which raised local objections – smoke fumes were said to be causing lung illnesses and fogs in winter.

Glasgow Corporation placed a limit of 100 sq yards on the surface area to be used for Glasgow Cross including the air vent. They agreed that Caledonian could purchase Nos 63-67 Trongate for a smoke escape shaft, provided the frontage of the building harmonised with other buildings being built by the Corporation.

On the Line’s closure in 1964 the fans were disconnected at the 3 uptakes at Anderston.”

This is the first I’ve heard of there being 3 fan-assisted vents at Anderston. That is why the NAS Drawing of the one at Brown Street was not what I expected to see and McEwan’s account now seems to verify its existence.

While there are Drawings of the infrastructure, diagrams, illustrations and photos of the ‘kit’ that performed the actual ventilation remain elusive. Mavors & Co became Anderson Boyes and their records for that period are held in a private collection. NRM has nothing, and Wigan Archives, home of the Walker & Co records (Wellington Court equipment suppliers) state Walkers order book does not include the name of the purchaser or details of what was supplied.

McEwan tells us the equipment was disconnected when the line closed in 1964, and there is anecdotal evidence that it was still there during the 1970’s. I would have thought that when the Argyle Line was being built, RCAHMS Archivists would have recorded equipment like this prior to its removal, in the same way that Ravenscraig Steelworks was recorded for posterity prior to its obliteration – but there is nothing at RCAHMS either.

Jim Summers
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Re: Glasgow Central Railway Tunnel Ventilator

Post by Jim Summers » Sat Jan 25, 2014 11:14 am

I am beginning to think that the Committee should invite as a speaker one of the current engineers dealing with the line.
I am sure all sorts of interesting snippets would come out about today's issues and what they have inherited.

And since I am still on the Committee, I suppose I better raise it next week!

Unfortunately the engineer who re-opened the line, Sandy Adams, and the project manager, Robin Kerr, are now dead, but their names deserve to be recorded. Clever chaps.

Jim S

John Paton
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Re: Glasgow Central Railway Tunnel Ventilator

Post by John Paton » Mon Jan 27, 2014 1:25 pm

Ian,

There was a ventilation area on the south side of the Anderston Cross : presumably lying off the south side of the station chamber. I haven't been in Anderston station for some time, but I guess that evidence in the form 1970s brickwork across the previous opening might be visible on the south wall.

I wonder if this is one of the locations of fan-assisted ventilation.

John
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IBrown
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Re: Glasgow Central Railway Tunnel Ventilator

Post by IBrown » Fri Mar 14, 2014 10:52 pm

I managed along to Anderston station today. I started at the east end and beyond the platform and wall cladding, the south wall does appear to have a portion of new brick infill 4 to 6 foot wide and stretching from rail to tunnel roof level. However the tunnel wall here bears the sign 'M8' so the infill could be road-building related rather than blocking off a transverse ventilation shaft. I then walked to the west end. The south walls revealed nothing above the cladding. There was something interesting in the roof above the Down (westbound) Line beyond the stairway :-
anderston1.jpg
Wooden Batten 'Hatch'
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I then looked at the Up line roof and alterations had been done there, though very possible this was done in connection with the construction of the new station building. Brick arch ceiling had been removed, and steel 'H' section girders installed fairly closely together (about the same width apart as the width of the hatch in the photo) above and across the track, supporting concrete beams running parallel to the track.

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